thenyworld:


This 1906 dataviz shows how much food New Yorkers consume in a year, at rapidly rising cost.

thenyworld:

This 1906 dataviz shows how much food New Yorkers consume in a year, at rapidly rising cost.


parishhall:

We held our 2nd Taste of a Place dinner Thursday, August 2nd, to celebrate the foods of the 5 boroughs of New York City and the publication of Robin Shulman’s Eat the City.

In addition to great food from Brooklyn Grange, Queens County Farm, Madani Halal (one of the city’s last remaining slaughterhouses), and Andrew’s Honey, we had rum distilled in Brooklyn, riesling vinified in Red Hook, beer brewed in Williamsburg, and a wine made from grapes grown in Manhattan.


Christopher Silas Neal / blog: Eat The City

csneal:

I recently worked with Random House to design a book jacket, map and chapter headers for Robin Shulman’s Eat The City. I had a great time working with Art Director Christopher Brand on the jacket and Elizabeth Rendfleisch on the interiors. Anyone interested in New York’s local food…

2 years ago - 25 -

Click here to hear me talking about Eat the City on WNYC/Brian Lehrer.

2 years ago -

The talented David Kaplowitz made an amazing short video featuring some of the people I write about in my book. Check it out.


(Source: mitchellsunderland)


A few more from Mercat Boqueria, Barcelona—because to convey the feel, the smell of the place, you really have to feature pork.

They call that vice grip on the pig leg a “jamonera.” Every place that sells a decent jamón has one, including restaurants. Looks something like an Inquisition torture device, right?


Mercat Boqueria, Barcelona!!


One more from the new rooftop farm at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

One more from the new rooftop farm at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.


The other day I went to Building 3 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where the farmers of Brooklyn Grange are building a new rooftop farm, about an acre large. Earth-movers were there pumping up earth up more than 10 stories from their truck on the ground, and the farmers were trying to stay right behind the earth installation, so that as soon as the fluffy soil was down, they were filling it with seeds and seedlings.

The roof had a sweeping view of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and harbor, the light was golden, everyone was happy. I planted lettuce seedlings and then poked holes in the soil with my index finger, dropped in lettuce seeds, and patted earth down so they wouldn’t blow away—it’s windy up there. Ben Flanner, the lead farmer, is already planning to sell the produce to restaurants.

In the elevator on the way out, two guys in polo shirts from an office on a lower floor got in and stared at the tanned, sunbleached, dirt-covered kids coming down from the roof.

"Like you’re going to grow vegetables in Brooklyn!" he said.